Magic is Not Real: Chapter Five: “I quit”

Dear Boss Lady,

After much consideration, I have decided to resign. I have learned a lot working with this organization. Everyone here is a delight to work alongside. Yes, when I joined the team and witnessed many of my colleagues leaving shortly after, I promised you three years; however, I can’t keep that promise. 

There are many aspects of this job I will dearly miss. Mostly, the office’s laid back atmosphere. I have been spoiled with my first job in this regard. Most employers do not have such a lax flex time policy, and my next career move will not have a such lax supervision. However, I believe it is in both of our best interests to for me to move on.

When I applied for this position, you had requested someone of entry level; however, I believe that you may be better served by someone of more experience that I possess. 

Thank you for the opportunity to work with such talented people, and I wish you the best.

Sincerely,
Gen. 

I thought to myself. If only it were that simple. I love working here, but I hate it too. Such conflicting emotions. Either way it is time for me to move on. Walking forward toward Magen’s office, my heartbeat quickened. A lump formed in my throat. Why can’t I quit with dignity? Here goes nothing.  My eyes begin to water.

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Who do I want to be in 10 years?

Who do I want to be in 10 years?

In 10 years, or today if possibly, I would like to be a productive member of society. Not just holding down a 9 to 5 job, and paying my taxes. I want to contribute to the betterment of society. Unfortunately, I am young and an idealist, among so many other labels.

There are many jobs and careers that I understand CAN ASSIST in the betterment of society; however, those jobs I do not see in themselves as a benefit to society. That mentality is part of my upbring, and I am working on changing that. With that said, I can’t for my own well being, work in those fields.

In another age, I might have been a philosopher–if there were ever an age that a woman could be such. The future is such a wonderful and dreadful thing to envision. My dream career would be to shape that future. Which may be why economics, especially behavioral economics interests me so greatly. However, even that may not get me to where I want to go.

In 10 years, I would like to see our civilization to the point where fewer people where food and shelter insecure. It is heartbreaking to see so many homeless and working poor struggling to get by. As a humanitarian, I cannot sit by and allow this to be.

In between now and the end of my life, I would like to be part of the change in society that eliminates poverty. Is this realistic? In my wording most definitely not. However, there is no excuse as to why we all should not be working toward the increase standard of living of society as a whole–especially the disadvantaged, the disabled, the homeless, the poor, and the ALL of society.

Tips of Ending Poverty: #2 Reflect Productivity

You don’t want to bust your a$$ making someone else rich while you go no where. Do not make others do that for you either.

Why do so many people want to or do start their own business? There are so many reasons why people want to own and/or run a business. Get rich. Make their own hours. Answer to no one, but themselves. Stick to The Man. All these reasons and more, can be summed up with the fact that they are tired of working all the time and getting nowhere real quick.

A rare few start a business because they have a new idea to take to market. We aren’t talking about those individuals.

It is awesome that people have the gumption to start their own business. It is great fuel for our economy. However, it is despicable that people are motivated to venture out on their own because they are not being properly compensated.

It has been a while since I have looked at the numbers, so bare with me on this. Off the top of my head, productivity has doubled since 1970-ish. Since then the average household income has stagnated.

To put it simply, pay your employees what they are worth–which isn’t always in line with what the market pays them.

One way we can all help to end poverty is buy local hire local. When you buy from a local retail store, you are helping an individual support themselves. When a local business hires local people to help run the business, they too are helping an individual support themselves. … Or even a family.

Take a fraction of your budget and spend it with a local business. Have $100 budgeted for groceries? Spend $10 with a local farmer, bakery, or other take-home-yummies maker. Have two date nights budgeted a month? Spend one at a mom-and-pop diner, or pay a friend to make you dinner –after all she wants to open up a restaurant.

Do you know crafty people? What about aspiring entrepreneurs? In most cases, it doesn’t take much to help support your community.

Remember: BUY LOCAL!

Choose a Career that Makes You Happy and Be Happy All-Around

As you might can tell by now, I am on a happiness-fulfilling-whole person binge right now. I have just finished reading How do You Define Success? Hopefully Like This. The overall theme is this… to focus energy in one area is to take energy away from another area. Something that the author did not address is that not all energy consumption is made equal.

How much energy that is require to perform your job function varies depending on a few factors. The first is the “physical” energy needed. A labor intensive job will require more energy – obviously – than a non labor intensive job. This requirement is more task based, though the individual plays a role too, such as muscle mass and motor function. However, there is also “emotional” energy.

How much emotional energy a job takes relies mostly on the individual and less on the task. Think about all the tasks or chores you HATE doing. Think about how you feel during or after completing them. If you hate your job, it is going to take more emotional energy and if you love your job.

Like-Hate is not the only component of emotional energy. There is also compensation and many others. If you want to have your cake and eat it too – which you deserve – you need to take this into account. If you hate your job, it is going to require more emotional energy dedicated to it in order to do your day-to-day job, but also to work towards an advancement.

Then there is also your attitude towards advancement in that career path. If you hate that career path, that will also increase emotional energy required. I could go on-and-on-and-on about all that goes into allocating emotional energy.

To sum it all up, find a career that you will enjoy and will enjoy advancing through. If you enjoy your career, you will have more energy to dedicate towards non-career related activities… and you will enjoy those more as well.

Commentary: My thoughts on “You have permission to not love your first job” by Michael A. Goodman

“You have permission to not love your first job” by Michael A. Goodman

Please read the article before reading mine. Thank you!

As a young adult and a semi-recent college graduate, I find career advice articles interesting. I read articles about job interviews, how to deal with co-workers, how to deal with clients, leadership advice, etc.

When this article floated by my LinkedIn feed, my thoughts were “I loved my first job, for a time.” The article is a short read, and I recommend it. Perhaps it will encourage you to stick it out with your current employer for a little while longer, perhaps it will encourage you to quit.

I have put in my resignation with my current employer. We have agreed on a 30 day plus or minus a week countdown. Why am I leaving? Many reasons and no reason at all, but basically because I am not happy here. The more politically correct reason is that I don’t see a future for myself and I don’t want to continue wasting my time.

Where do I see myself in the future? That’s a good question. The answer is that I have no idea. What I do know is that I want my cake and eat it too. I want a large salary. I want an insane amount of personal time. I want my job to be my life, but I don’t want my life to be my job.

Not too long ago, I once said that I wanted a job that I didn’t have to work when I went home for the day. My first year in the workforce has taught me that there are many reasons professionals work extra hours. Some do it out of necessity because that is the only way the work will get done. Some do it for advancement. Others do it for the passion. I have decided that I want a career that I am passionate about.

Of course, this is not why I quit.

My co-workers are amazing. The pay is okay for my position and experience. The overall atmosphere is outstanding, and I have learned a lot about the industry. All-in-all, this has been a great first job.

However, this is not my passion. Learning about this industry is taxing on me, to put politely. Impolitely… It is boring. I don’t care about it. This industry will not be helpful in preventing or surviving post-apocalyptic society. Also, I am not mastering the skills necessary for my primary job function, and I am taking that failure much too personally to the end that it is affecting my overall health.

If you haven’t read the article by now and hate spoilers, don’t continue yet. However, you should read his final words if nothing else.

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